Wednesday, 21 September 2016

Itty Bitty Bat - German translation

I'm sure some of you are starting to think about Halloween already, so if you want to crochet something cute for the occasion, why not check out my Itty Bitty Bat pattern (see the list of free patterns on the right for the link), which now includes a version in German, courtesy of Annet Tafelski.



Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Star Wars Even More Crochet

I finished work on all my patterns for the new Star Wars Crochet book a little while ago, but I've now been given the publication date. Star Wars Even More Crochet will be available (in the US at least) in March 2017. I know that seems a long way away, but it takes that long to produce.


The book is part of a kit that will include all the materials and the patterns to make a Jawa and BB-8, and the patterns for Rey, Finn, Poe Dameron, Kylo Ren, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Lando Calrissian, Admiral Ackbar, Nien Nunb, Greedo and the Cantina Band.

Friday, 8 April 2016

Solid Square Blanket

I've been very busy working on my next Star Wars pattern book, so I haven't got many new projects to share. However, before I got started on the book I made a crochet blanket just for myself. Having finally got myself on Pinterest I'd discovered and pinned all sorts of lovely patterns, and I decided to make something fairly simple but colourful. I got inspiration from The Patchwork Heart and used the colour pack for this blanket to work out how much yarn I'd need.


I wanted this blanket to go in my bedroom, so I chose the colours to match a wallhanging that we have above the bed. I must admit, I decided on a range of blues and reds, but when some of them weren't in stock, I chose some alternatives that I slightly regretted (the purple in particular), but I was impatient to get on with it!


The basic pattern for the squares is very simple, I tweaked the pattern a little after looking in an old motif book that I have, but it's a very common square that you'll come across everywhere. I worked all the first rounds, then all the second rounds, and so on, and in fact, it felt like it worked up quite quickly, though I didn't work out exactly how long I spent on it. It was nice to work in separate motifs as I started on it when the weather was still quite warm, and I didn't fancy sitting under an increasingly large blanket!

The amount of yarn I'd bought (ten 100g balls of Stylecraft Special DK in different colours - Lipstick, Burgundy, Gold, Claret, Midnight, Sherbet, Teal, Denim, Storm Blue, Plum - and four balls in Stone for the outside of each square and joining) was supposed to be enought for a blanket 8 by 8 squares, but I found I only used about half of the colours before the last round once I'd made 64 squares. I wasn't sure how much of the joining yarn I was going to use, so I ended up making 90 squares, and the four balls of the Stone were just enough to make the final rounds and join all the squares for a blanket that size.


I joined the squares using sc(US)/dc(UK) through the edge of two squares at a time, it's a quick way to join and is very neat, smooth on the front and giving a ridge on the back of the blanket, which you can see in the photo below. I do like the way that the holes on each corner of each round make a pattern when the squares are all joined together.


I'm very happy with my blanket, which is just for me, even though the colours don't work as well as I'd wanted. I use it on my bed as an extra layer if it's very cold (my husband doesn't really feel the cold, so it only needs to be large enough to go on my side of the bed). It's also good for napping under when it's not so cold, and as I fold it up when I'm not using it, it hasn't got covered in cat or dog hairs!

Saturday, 19 March 2016

Spring and Easter Patterns



We’ve had a lovely week here in the south of England, still quite chill but with lots of blue skies and sunshine, so it’s started to feel like spring – some of the muddy paths on my regular dog walks have even started to dry up! However, I still can’t believe it’s only a week until Easter. I thought I’d put together a list of my patterns that might be good to make for Easter, maybe as a substitute for one more chocolate egg, or as little extras in an Easter basket. I’ve also picked a few that make me think of spring, and getting outside to enjoy nature. Just click on the name to go to the patterns.

This is a pattern that allows you to make a cute lamb or rabbit, with the choice to have them wearing a dress/skirt or a sweater (jumper in the UK, hence the name). They’re about 6.5” tall (not including the rabbit’s ears) and would make a great Easter gift.




I originally designed these at Easter, the idea is that they’re egg-shaped, but also that I associate gnomes with gardening, and spring is when all the flowers start to appear. I think they’d be great to make as a gift with some packets of seeds and some plant pots or garden tools.





This pattern to make a set of crocheted mini creatures also reminds of spring, and children getting outside and exploring. Make it so you don’t end up with the real creatures in your house!








This is a very simple free pattern to make a cute little egg friend for Easter. I made a set of six for each of my boys and put them in old egg boxes, and they went on all sorts of adventures together!




Here’s a free pattern to make a little Easter bunny – you can make it in natural colours, or go for spring pastels, or even make it look like a chocolate bunny.



Tiny Chick
Very quick and easy to make, imagine lots of these on the breakfast table on Easter Sunday.




I haven’t seen any lambs in the fields yet, but here’s a free pattern to make a tiny little sheep, perfect for all us yarn lovers.



If you’d like a more realistic looking rabbit, here’s a tiny one you can make.



Monday, 22 February 2016

Star Wars Crochet - the second book

Good news! I'm currently working on patterns for a second Star Wars Crochet pattern book. I'm afraid I can't give away much information yet, not even which characters will feature in it, but I thought I'd let you know.

Saturday, 12 December 2015

Mini Father Christmas - free crochet pattern

Here we come to the last in my collection of free Christmas crochet patterns, a miniature Father Christmas that you can make into a tree decoration, or add to a little festive scene. He’ll look sweet together with the penguin and snowman patterns I posted previously, though I think the mouse and the robin would look a bit giant next to him!

I hope you’ve been enjoying all the Christmas patterns, and found a few little things that you can make at the last minute if necessary. If you ever want to find them again, you’ll see a list of all my free patterns to the right of this page, just click on any that you’re interested in.

 
Abbreviations:
ch = chain
st = stitch or stitches
sc = single crochet (US), double crochet (UK)
dc = double crochet (US), treble crochet (UK)
tog = together
sc2tog = decrease by working two sc together
bob = bobble (see special stitch instructions)
BLO = work in back loop only
FO = fasten off

Approximate size: 6cm/2.5" tall.

General instructions:
Work in rounds unless otherwise stated and do not join rounds unless told to. Use a stitch marker to mark the start of a round - a small piece of different coloured yarn placed under the stitch at the start of the round will do. To start a round, you can use the magic ring method, but I prefer to ch 2, and work the appropriate number of sc into 1st ch. If you work the sc over the tail of yarn as well you can use that to pull the hole tight.

When changing from one colour of yarn to another work the stitch before the change until there are two loops left on the hook. Then use the new colour for the final yarn over hook and pull through. When you use two different colours on the same round, as you do for the face, carry the colour you are not using behind the one you are working with.

Work through both loops of stitches unless otherwise indicated.

Special stitch instructions:
2dc bob: bobble stitch for beard. YOH, insert hook into next stitch, YOH and pull through stitch, YOH, pull through 2 loops, YOH, insert hook into same stitch, YOH and pull through stitch, YOH, pull through 2 loops, YOH, pull through all 3 loops on hook.

You will need:
Small amounts of double knitting or worsted weight yarn in red, white, black and skin colour.
A length of cotton yarn to hang as a decoration.
Small amount of stuffing.
3.5mm (E) hook.
Tapestry needle.



Pattern:
Start with red yarn.
Round 1: Ch 2, work 5 sc into 1st ch - 5 st.
Round 2: 2 sc in next st, sc in next 4 st - 6 st.
Round 3: [2 sc in next st, sc in next st] 3 times - 9 st.

Round 4: Sc in each st around – 9 st.
Round 5: [2 sc in next st, sc in next 2 st] 3 times - 12 st.
Round 6: Sc in each st around – 12 st.
Change to white yarn.
Round 7: Sc in each st around – 12 st.
Change to skin colour yarn.
Round 8: BLO Sc in next 6 st, change to white yarn, sc in next 6 st – 12 st.
Round 9: Sc in next 6 st, change to white yarn, sc in next 6 st – 12 st.
Round 10: Sc in next st, 2dc bob in each of next 4 st, sc in next st, change to red yarn, sc in next 6 st – 12 st.
Round 11: Sc in each st around – 12 st.
Round 12: 2 sc in next 6 st, sc in next 6 st - 18 st.
Round 13: Sc in each st around – 18 st.
Change to black yarn.
Round 14: Sc in each st around – 18 st.
Change to red yarn.
Round 15 - 17: (3 rounds) Sc in each st around – 18 st.
Round 18: [Sc2tog, sc in next st] 6 times – 12 st.
Round 19: Sc2tog 6 times – 6 st.

FO, leaving a length of yarn, and stuff. With the cotton yarn, sew a loop at the top of the head if you want to hang as a decoration. Using black yarn sew eyes and a little mouth on top of the beard. Finish stuffing and sew up bottom neatly.

 

 

Friday, 11 December 2015

Tiny Christmas Robin - free crochet pattern


Apparently, robins are associated with Christmas, at least in Britain, because of Victorian postmen, who wore bright red jackets and were nicknamed ‘Robins’. As they were a welcome sight, delivering the newly invented Christmas cards, their feathered namesakes soon became popular in the designs of the cards. Of course, robins are also delightful birds, easily visible and seemingly friendly (especially if you’re doing some gardening, when they swoop in and devour any bugs you’ve unearthed), who look particularly striking against a snowy backdrop with their bright red breasts.

With this crochet pattern you can make yourself a tiny little robin, only about 3 cm/1.5" tall. Simple and quick to make, with minimal sewing, he’s perfect to hang on your tree, or decorate anywhere else you like.

 
Abbreviations:
ch = chain
st = stitch or stitches
ss = slipstitch
sc = single crochet (US), double crochet (UK)
dc = double crochet (US), treble crochet (UK)
tog = together
sc2tog = decrease by working two sc together
FO = fasten off

General instructions:
Work in rounds unless otherwise stated and do not join rounds unless told to. Use a stitch marker to mark the start of a round - a small piece of different coloured yarn placed under the stitch at the start of the round will do. To start a round, you can use the magic ring method, but I prefer to ch 2, and work the appropriate number of sc into 1st ch. If you work the sc over the tail of yarn as well you can use that to pull the hole tight.

When changing from one colour of yarn to another work the stitch before the change until there are two loops left on the hook. Then use the new colour for the final yarn over hook and pull through.

Work through both loops of stitches unless otherwise indicated.

Special stitch instructions:
3 dc bob: bobble stitch. YOH (yarn over hook), insert hook into next stitch, YOH and pull through loop, YOH, pull through 2 loops, *YOH, insert hook into same stitch, YOH and pull through loop, YOH, pull through 2 loops, repeat once from*, YOH, pull through all 4 loops on hook.

You will need:
Small amounts of red, brown and white yarn, double knitting or worsted weight.
Small amount of black yarn for the eyes and beak.
A length of cotton yarn to hang as a decoration.
Small amount of stuffing.
3.5mm (E) hook.
Tapestry needle.



Pattern:
Start with red yarn.
Round 1: Ch 2, work 6 sc into 1st ch - 6 st.
Round 2: 2 sc in each st around - 12 st.
Round 3: [2 sc in next st, sc in next st] 6 times – 18 st.

Round 4: Sc in next 8 st, change to white yarn, sc in next 10 st – 18 st.
Change to brown yarn
Round 5: Sc in each st around - 18 st.
Round 6: Sc in next st, [wing: ss in next st, ch 4, miss ch next to hook, sc in next ch, dc in next ch, sc in next ch, ss back into original st], sc in next st, [3dc bob] 3 times, sc in next st, [wing: as before], sc in next 10 st – 18 st.
Push bobbles from the inside out, they will form the head.
Round 7: Sc in each st around - 18 st.
Round 8: [Sc2tog, sc in next st] 4 times, sc2tog, [tail: ss in next st, ch 4, miss ch next to hook, sc in next 3 ch, ss back into original st], sc2tog, sc in next st – 12 st.
Round 9: Sc2tog 6 times – 6 st.
FO, leaving a length of yarn.

Embroider the eyes using three short lines of black yarn for each eye. Make the beak by sewing a French knot with the black yarn. To do this, take the yarn out between the eyes and, with the needle held close to this point, wrap the yarn three times around the needle. Sew back into the head very close to the point where the yarn came out.

Using cotton yarn, sew a loop at the top of the head if you want to hang your robin as a decoration. Finish stuffing and neatly sew up the hole at the back. Don’t cut the brown yarn but use it to keep the wings in place. Sew one or two stitches in the middle of each wing to attach it to the back.